In The News

Since its launch in May 2014, the National Resource Network has garnered national and local media attention highlighting its work partnering with cities around the country and citing the impact those partnerships have had on communities. Check out highlights of that coverage below.

New and Notable Coverage

 

Nobody Wins if Hartford Goes Bankrupt

HARTFORDCOURANT.COM; By DAVID EICHENTHAL; May 7, 2017

For Hartford, the threat of bankruptcy is real. Other cities have structural deficits — where growth in expenditures outpaces growth in revenue. Hartford, however, also faces an immediate cash flow crisis. Structural deficits can be solved over time. Cash flow crises require immediate action so that the city can pay its bills.

Earlier this year, the National Resource Network — a federally funded consortium of urban experts — was brought on to help Hartford identify options to achieve fiscal sustainability. As the General Assembly considers proposals to aid Hartford and the city council debates budget for the fiscal year starting July 1, here are some of our preliminary findings.

 

Federal agency announces recommendations for downtown Scranton revitalization

THETIMES-TRIBUNE.COM; By PETER CAMERON; February 10, 2017

A report announced Thursday by National Resource Network designates volunteer community leadership organization Scranton Tomorrow as the city’s lead partner in a push to revitalize the downtown.

Tools to accomplish that goal could include offering businesses and property owners tax incentives, renovating and repurposing old buildings to make them more attractive to buyers and planting trees and other greenery in downtown areas, said Leslie Memolo Collins, executive director of Scranton Tomorrow.

 

Failure and bankruptcy are not options for Providence

PROVIDENCEJOURNAL.COM; By DAVID EICHENTHAL & SETH WILLIAMS; January 31, 2017

Providence faces serious economic and fiscal challenges. Last year, the National Resource Network projected that Providence has a structural budget deficit totaling $176 million through Fiscal Year 2026 - driven in part by the burden of public employee pension liabilities totaling $1 billion and additional unfunded retiree health care benefits.

 

It's not just Petersburg

WASHINGTONPOST.COM; BY DAVID EICHENTHAL; October, 14, 2016

Over the past three years, a consortium of urban experts from the private, nonprofit and academic sectors has worked to equip local governments with innovative strategies to build operational capacity, foster collaboration among stakeholders and boost competitiveness to produce economic benefits. Launched under the auspices of the White House Council on Strong Cities, Strong Communities and backed by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the National Resource Network is the only federal program that provides comprehensive technical assistance to cities, including guidance on fiscal management. The network offers the playbook and the coach, helping city leadership set realistic priorities, goals and a starting point for the recovery process.

 

 

Reckoning Time for a City’s Bad Fiscal Decisions

GOVERNING; BY CHARLES CHIEPPO; SEPTEMBER 19, 2016

The longer a government's finances are allowed to deteriorate, the fewer options there are when corrective action is finally taken. Anyone who doubts that ought to look at a proposed 10-year plan commissioned by the city of Providence, R.I., and produced by the federal National Resource Network (NRN).

 

Group says Springfield poverty trend will grow without action

KY3 News; BY LINDA RUSSELL; AUGUST 16, 2016

About one out of every four people in Springfield lives in poverty. The National Resource Network, a group that aims to help cities with poverty rates higher than 20 percent, says the trend will only continue if something isn't done.

"In Springfield, we have a lot of action, a lot of collaboratives, a lot of initiatives, but there's not a system in place to really understand what the results of these activities are, as well as they may be misaligned," said Erika Ruiz, a member of the National Resource Network.

Scranton might create entity dedicated to downtown revitalization 

TheTimes-Tribune.com; BY JIM LOCKWOOD; MAY 11, 2016

The city reached an agreement with the National Resource Network for its assistance in guiding implementation of a revitalization plan for the city and anchor institutions and stakeholders to follow, city Business Administrator David Bulzoni said.

"We're hoping to take it to the next step," NRN Executive Director David Eichenthal said of building upon the chamber's model. "Who drives implementation of that plan on a day-to-day basis? Who wakes up every morning and thinks how to get this done?"

 

First of its kind: Local dashboard could help reduce smoking, obesity and poverty rates in KCK

 KSHB.COM (KCK); BY TERRA HALL; APRIL 5, 2016

"This dashboard that the National Resource Network is going to allow us to do is going to look at the inputs that we are doing and say are they having a positive impact in the things we are trying to address rather than waiting on the county-by-county health rankings," said Holland.

At the end of period, KCK will finally be able to see how it stacks up to similar cities, as well as having a baseline for itself to know what's going well and what needs to be improved upon.

"Right now most cities that want to act on improving health standards and the quality of life for their citizens are acting in the dark," said Kleiman. "There is no clear sense of what the numbers or indicators are. That is what we are aiming to do by working with Mayor Holland over the next 10 months."

Flint shows need for innovative city-state partnerships

MYSTATESMAN.COM; BY MALCOLM DUNCAN AND AJA BROWN; MARCH 15, 2016

Mayors Malcolm Duncan of Waco, TX and Aja Brown of Compton, CA recently released an op-ed on the importance of city-state partnerships and cites the National Resource Network as a model to address challenges in cities across the country.

Read more about the importance of city-state partnerships, here.

 

New Project Aims To Help Cities Finally Get Health Data They Can Use

SIDE EFFECTS PUBLIC MEDIA; BY ANDREA MURASKIN; MARCH 11, 2016

The Municipal Health Data for American Cities Initiative is a collaboration between New York University and the National Resource Network, a White House and HUD-funded agency that assists cities facing economic hardship.

In its pilot phase, the initiative will focus on four cities: Flint, Michigan, Kansas City, Kansas, Providence, Rhode Island, and Waco, Texas. The plan is for the project to base its data collection around concerns expressed by city leaders, including alcohol and drug addiction, lack of access to healthy food, chronic disease, lead exposure, and more.

 

Waco participates in pilot health project

NEWS CHANNEL 25; BY TAHESHAH MOIS; FEBRUARY 29, 2016

Waco is one of four cities nationwide to participate in the first ever Local Health Data Dashboard. 

Prosper Waco is partnering with the National Resource Network, and New York University on the national level, and the Waco-McLennan County Public health District, Baylor Scott and White Hillcrest Medical Center and Providence Health Center locally.

 

New study will look at Flint's health

MICHIGAN RADIO; BY STEVE CARMODY; FEBRUARY 29, 2016

Flint is one of four cities that’s getting its health put under the microscope. Flint, Michigan, Kansas City, Kansas, Providence, Rhode Island and Waco, Texas were named pilot cities in the Municipal Health Data for American Cities Initiative last week.

 

State Resource Network can help Central Mass. innovate

WORCESTER BUSINESS JOURNAL; BY ANNE HAYES; FEBRUARY 29, 2016

To double down on the commonwealth's deep commitment to our Gateway Cities, MassDevelopment and the National Resource Network recently announced the launch of the nation's first State Resource Network.

This pilot partnership will provide up to 10 cities facing economic challenges with comprehensive and cross-cutting assistance designed to increase their competitiveness. The 16 eligible cities are Brockton, Everett, Fitchburg, Haverhill, Holyoke, Lawrence, Leominster, Lowell, Lynn, Malden, New Bedford, Peabody, Pittsfield, Revere, Springfield and Worcester.

 

Fitchburg aims to tap into new state network
SENTINEL & ENTERPRISE; BY ANNA BURGESS; FEBRUARY 15, 2016

MassDevelopment and the National Resource Network recently announced the launch of the Massachusetts State Resource Network, the first state-based organization to give cities the type of expert consulting and technical assistance as the National Resource Network.
 

 

 

Coverage of Specific Network Engagements and Projects

Engagements:
 
Policy Reports:
  • Hidden in Plain Sight: Why California’s Economically Challenged Cities Matter
  • Striking a (Grand) Local Bargain: How Cities and Anchor Institutions Can Work Together to Drive Economic Prosperity
 
Other:
  • National Resource Network Recognized as a “Bright Idea”
  • 311 for Cities
  • Launch

 

FORT MYERS, FLORIDA

Fort Myers looks to attack poverty, improve affordable housing

NEWS-PRESS; BY CODY DULANEY; JANUARY, 29, 2016

Fort Myers took financial steps Tuesday night toward attacking poverty and improving affordable housing. The city council unanimously agreed to spend $26,825 in cooperation with the National Resource Network to identify solutions for economic recovery and growth, with a focus on residential development. The National Resource Network, a White House initiative, selected Fort Myers because of its “strong track record” in following plans to focus on areas of improvement, interim Assistant City Manager Matt Johnson said, citing the city’s downtown development with the Andres Duany plan.

 

FALL RIVER, MASSACHUSETTS

Troubled Fall River to get outside advice

THE BOSTON GLOBE; BY MEGAN WOOLHOUSE; MAY 27, 2014

Despite numerous efforts to boost its economy and city finances, Fall River remains a struggling factory town, its unemployment rate among the highest in the state. Mayor William A. Flanagan, currently in his second term, welcomed them [National Resource Network] open arms. “I don’t have all the answers,” Flanagan said. “I think the way you make yourself better is to surround yourself with motivated, competent people who want to see you succeed.” “What we’re trying to do is work with cities to identify things that can be catalytic –or in some cases transformative,” said David Eichenthal.

 

Fall River part of federal pilot program aimed at boosting economic developmentHerald News; By Jo. C. Goode; May 22, 2014

Over 50 cities, including Fall River, now have direct access to this “311 for Cities” resource, with the ability to receive expert assistance via the network website,www.nationalresourcenetwork.org.City officials will be able to log on and get best practices and advice from national experts on community development, economic development, operations, budget and other key issues.

 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI

The Clarion Ledger; BY TONY YARBER; JULY, 31, 2015

Mayor Yarber’s 2015 State of the City Address

“As the year approaches, we are pleased to have federal and private partnerships that see the viability in our great city. The National Resource Network, an organization derived from a White House initiative to build stronger communities and stronger cities, will be partnering with us in our endeavor to foster more economic development throughout Jackson which includes the often forgotten South and West sides of town. This opportunity to create lasting economic growth in our city speaks to the belief that external partners have in our city. As work with the National Resource Network takes off this year, the city will also host an initiative geared toward improving performance management, data analysis, and creating an Open Data platform for Jackson. This would allow citizens to see real time results and information about the challenges, finances, and progression of our city. Industry leading experts will be brought in to assist with the development of this plan, and thanks to the backing of outside funding our city will move forward and be better without causing a financial burden of the city or its citizens.”

 

MERIDIAN, MISSISSIPPI

MERIDIAN STAR; BY JEFF BYRD; AUGUST 1, 2015

City officials push for medical district development

Meridian Mayor Assistant Richie McAlister and state House representative Charles Young (D-Meridian) met last month with officials with NRN in Miami. On Tuesday, at the Meridian City Council's work session, McAlister and Young gave an update on how Mayor Percy Bland's administration is progressing with the network.

"The National Resource Network is helping us move forward with our downtown medical district," McAlister said. "We hope to have a final report completed by the end of the year. One of the keys will be to see if these federal TIGER Grants can help us in the area around the hospital."

New council president wants city to focus on infrastructure

THE MERIDIAN STAR; BY JEFF BYRD JUNE 20, 2015

Hammon cited two other issues that will affect how Meridian moves forward in the next year. One is the ongoing issue with the Environmental Protection Agency. In February, the EPA had alleged the city was in violation of the Clean Water Act, largely due to sewer system overflows during wet weather.

The second, is with the National Resource Network (NRN). The city of Meridian is working with NRN to help further its role as the region's medical hub by creating an enhanced medical district.

"We are already doing something about both of those, so I feel that we are ahead of the curve," Hammon said. "The NRN has come back with a report and not only said they can help us with the medical quarter, but they can also help us get some federal grants. Richie McAlister (assistant to Mayor Bland) at the mayor's office, has been working with them and I think he's done a great job of keeping communication with the National Resource Network so we can get these grants. We've already got the report, now we need them to help us push forward."

National Resource Network

WTOK NEWSCENTER 11; DECEMBER 18, 2014

In a vote of 5-0 the Meridian City Council Tuesday passed a memorandum of understanding that will provide Meridian with assistance from the National Resource Network to help provide various expertise for improving Meridian and the surrounding areas. “The National Resource Network is a government run program to help cities not only to know what their problems are but to give them the resources from the government to help them in those areas. Just like urban blight, police work, they will give suggestions that other cities have done or monies available by the government to take advantage of the programs to get these things done," said Ward 5 Councilman Randy Hammon.

Feds Tap Meridian for Economic Revitalization

THE MERIDIAN STAR: FROM STAFF REPORTS; DECEMBER 18, 2014

The Network provides customized tools and advice to build strategic partnerships, strengthen economic competitiveness, and marshal public and private sector resources in selected cities, a press release states. Meridian is one of the first cities chosen to be part of this initiative. The Network is also working with Kansas City, Kans., Fall River, Mass., and the city of Miami, Fla. “Being able to connect our ideas to the resources and expertise at the Network will help us reach our goals for the community," Meridian Mayor Percy Bland said. "We have an opportunity, right now, to solve a lot of our problems. The Network will provide technical assistance to get us from Point A to Point B. At the end of the day, it’s about results.”

 

PEORIA, ILLINOIS

Peoria looks to national 'Strong Cities' analysis for south side

JOURNALSTAR; BY LAURA NIGHTENGALE, JANUARY 26, 2016

The City Council on Tuesday approved an agreement with the National Resource Network that will provide a comprehensive analysis of South Peoria that Councilwoman Denise Moore hopes will lead to change in the economically depressed part of the community.

 

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND

Providence one of four cities chosen for national health data initiative

PROVIDENCE BUSINESS NEWS; BY PBN STAFF; FEBRUARY 25, 2016

PROVIDENCE – Rhode Island’s capital city is one of four cities in the nation chosen by the National Resource Network and New York University for a pilot program that uses city-level health data to help shape policy decisions and public health investments.

New Public Health 'Dashboard' Coming to Providence
RHODE ISLAND PUBLIC RADIO; BY KRISTIN GOURLAY; FEBRUARY 17, 2016

Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza hopes a new public health "dashboard" will help inform policy and improve health.

$225 Grant to Help Providence Develop Long-Range Plan 

PROVIDENCE JOURNAL; BY JOHN HILL, NOVEMBER 13, 2015

Mayor Jorge O. Elorza said the city’s current problems are largely because it has not adequately planned for future needs, such as road repairs or renovations to schools. He said he hoped the Resource Network would help the city devise ways to prioritize what needed to be done first, but on a several-years-out schedule. Elorza and Eichenthal said the development of the Route 195 corridor, and the development it will bring over the years, is an opportunity for the city to start planning for future revenue and service needs. Elorza said another goal of the effort is to better integrate city departments and give their employees a clearer idea of what the city is trying to accomplish.

 

RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 

Richmond receives sobering prognosis of its finances

CONTRA COSTA TIMES;BY KARINA IOFFEE; DECEMBER 16, 2015

There are many reasons for the increased expenditures including excessive overtime, especially among public safety employees, and increased pension and health care costs. Richmond also has the highest spending on public safety among Bay Area cities, according to Russ Branson, a senior management consultant with Public Financial Management. The San Francisco firm is part of the National Resource Network, which has spent several months helping Richmond prepare a five-year financial plan to help the city weather any financial changes.

Independent audit: Richmond faces $22.7 million deficit by 2021

THE RICHMOND STANDARD;BY MIKE ALDAX; DECEMBER 16, 2015

Russ Branson, a public finance expert with the National Resource Network – a federal program assisting cities with ongoing financial challenges – presented a five-year financial forecast at Tuesday’s council meeting that recommended big spending cuts starting need fiscal year, actions that will unavoidably impact employees and reduce city services.

 

Mayor Butt: State controller cancels threat of Richmond audit

THE RICHMOND STANDARD; BY MAYOR TOM BUTT; OCTOBER 1, 2015

At the Sept. 29, 2015, City Council meeting, the City Council authorized the city manager to move ahead with an agreement with the National Resource Network to provide the City of Richmond with expert assistance in building a sophisticated long-term financial model that can not only inform internal decision making but should also address some of the concerns of the bond rating agencies.

Obama Administration tasks national experts to come up with ‘transformative’ project in Richmond

THE RICHMOND STANDARD, JUNE 22, 2015

The Obama Administration is sending a team of experts to Richmond next month for a two-day visit that local officials hope will lead to solutions for the city’s affordable housing needs and the revitalization of Hilltop Mall and downtown Richmond. In May, the city submitted an application to receive technical assistance through President Obama’s Strong Cities, Strong Communities (SC2) Initiative. The city is tapping the initiative’s the National Resource Network, a first of its kind program where leading experts from both the public and private sectors help local governments overcome economic and fiscal challenges, among other obstacles.

 

SCRANTON, PENNSYLVANIA

Group says Scranton needs another downtown advocacy organization

THE TIMES-TRIBUNE SCRANTON;BY JIM LOCKWOOD; DECEMBER 30, 2015

The National Resource Network, established a few years ago with seed money from the federal government, recently performed a free initial assessment of Scranton that reviewed demographics, data, challenges and strengths. Citing the city’s long-term population decline as a backdrop, the NRN review noted recent ups and downs, such as the amount and duration of vacant office space downtown, a recent drop in rents for office space and a burgeoning growth of apartments in converted office space.

 

WACO, TEXAS

Betting on vibrant, healthy neighborhoods to produce vibrant, healthy schools: Q&A with Waco ISD officials Pat Atkins, Angela Tekell and Bonny Cain

WACOTRIB.COM; BY BILL WHITAKER; January 17, 2016

The Mayor wants to get together with me (Pat Atkins) and Prosper Waco executive director Matthew Polk to get the city’s input on who needs to serve on these committees. He thinks the people from the National Resource Network [a national nonprofit working with Prosper Waco on battling local poverty] need to be there because they’re going to commit to specific programming targeting neighborhoods around Brook Avenue and J.H. Hines. So I think there’s an appreciation on the council or, at least, the mayor, who has said we need to come down and speak to the entire council and say, “This is a community issue and these neighborhoods need additional investment and let’s work together through these committees.”

Council pushing for 2-way downtown Waco streets, new bus system

WACOTRIB.COM; BY J.B.SMITH; NOVEMBER 2, 2015

The federally funded National Resource Network has chosen to provide Waco in the coming year $500,000 worth of consulting on social and economic challenges. David Eichenthal, the organization’s executive director, was one of three network officials who spent the day with the council at its retreat on the top floor of McLane Stadium. Eichenthal said the network is investing more in Waco than in any other city, largely because of the community’s Prosper Waco initiative to address poverty. “We thought there was a basic readiness and willingness to address issues,” he said. “There was an extraordinary amount of capacity here.”

Prosper Waco Education effort on right track, consultants say

WACOTRIB.COM; STEPHANIE BUTTS; OCTOBER 30, 2015

Consultants from the National Resource Network assured local education leaders Friday that Prosper Waco’s education efforts can be successful since the initiative is using tested programs and sharing data with key community partners. National Resource Network representatives Christa Payne and Deb Vaughn congratulated Prosper Waco officials for their efforts and said they were on the right track to making substantial changes in the community. Payne works as a senior managing consultant for Public Financial Management, an arm of the National Resource Center. Vaughn is a private consultant for the NRN.

Are Waco’s Chronic Poverty Woes a Lost Cause? Q&A with National Resource Network executive director David Eichenthal

WACOTRIB.COM; BY BILL WHITAKER; SEPTEMBER 13, 2015

Bill Whitaker, WACOTRIB.com

Last week, the National Resource Network, a consortium created to leverage the expertise, partnerships and resources of both public and private sectors to help cities comprehensively address their most pressing challenges, began a series of monthly visits to Waco to help craft and refine strategies overseen by the Prosper Waco planning process involving more than 100 volunteers, many of them civic leaders, and all focused on battling poverty. The network’s “all-star” team of experts spent part of the week discussing goals and concerns with health professionals, business leaders, educators and government officials regarding this much-splintered problem.

Federally backed network to mentor Prosper Waco effort

WACOTRIB.COM; BY J.B. SMITH; AUGUST, 26, 2015

City of Waco Budget Ok'd

WACOTRIB.COM; BY J.B. SMITH; AUGUST 18, 2015

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In other business Tuesday, the council agreed to partner with the National Resource Network for the next year for $490,000 worth of technical assistance to get the Prosper Waco initiatives rolling. The city council agreed to pay $122,000 for its share of the service, with the balance coming from the federally funded network itself.

The network will bring in national experts to help analyze and find solutions for Waco’s poverty issues, using data and experiences from other communities.

 
Policy Coverage 

For additional information about the reports released by the Nation Resource Network, please visit this page.

Hidden in Plain Sight: Why California's Economically Challenged Cities Matter

The National Resource Network released its second policy report in November 2015, researching the impact and potential of economically challenged communities on the state of California.

Report: Hanford is ‘economically challenged’

The Sentinel; BY SETH NIDEVER; DECEMEBER, 1, 2015

Hanford is one of 77 California cities with at least 40,000 people that is "economically challenged," according to a recent report from a public-private partnership, National Resource Network.

Editorial: Why Many California Cities Struggle

Orange County Register; NOVEMBER 30, 2015

Hidden in Plain Sight: Why California’s Economically Challenged Cities Matter.” The NRN calls itself a “core component of the Obama administration’s Strong Cities, Strong Communities initiative” funded by the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Dan Walters: Our cities have become vulnerable

The Sacramento Bee; BY DAN WALTER; NOVEMBER 29, 2015

The National Resource Network, which is affiliated with the White House Council on Strong Cities, identified 297 American cities deemed to be “economically challenged” and discovered that California has a disproportionately high number that suffer from high unemployment and poverty rates and low levels of educational attainment

Santa Maria, Lompoc economically challenged, study finds

Lompoc Record; BY KENNY LINDBERG; NOVEMBER, 29, 2015

Santa Maria and Lompoc are among California’s most economically challenged cities, according to a new study by the National Resource Network, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Economy is Up; So is State's Distress,

San Diego Union-Tribune; BY STEVEN GREENHUT; NOVEMBER 20, 2015

A new report from the federally backed National Resource Network published a long list of economically challenged cities, with a focus on California. The report spotlights our state because of its size and urbanization – and its high concentration of distressed places.

The “Hidden In Plain Sight” report lists 77 distressed California cities – defined as those with at least one of the following: unemployment rates above 9 percent as of 2013, where 20 percent or more adults are in poverty or where the population had declined by at least 5 percent over the last decade.

CHALLENGED CALIFORNIA,

Politico; BY CARLA MARINUCCI; NOVEMBER 19, 2015

California, the nation’s most populous state, is also the “most urban” state -- home to 12 million residents who live in 1 in 4 of the nation’s most “economically challenged” cities battered by unemployment and poverty, a new report finds. The study called “Hidden in Plain Sight,” from the National Resource Network, cited Los Angeles, Oakland, Sacramento, Riverside and Long Beach cited as prime examples of the most challenged cities in California.

77 California Cities on “Economically Challenged” List,

The Sacramento Bee; BY DAN WALTERS; NOVEMBER 18, 2015

Moreover, says the report from the National Resource Network, California’s distressed cities are more than a quarter of the 297 U.S. cities over 40,000 population that fall into that category. The organization is affiliated with the White House Council on Strong Cities.

 
Striking a (Local) Grand Bargain

In September 2015, the National Resource Network released its first report illustrating that while cities can benefit from relationships with local anchors – colleges, universities, and hospitals – the full potential of these partnerships has not been realized because of mistrust, half-starts and half-realized results.

3 Steps Cities Can Take to Anchor Economic Partnerships

CITIESPEAK.ORG; BY NEIL KLEIMAN; NOVEMBER 20, 2015

In the report, Striking a (Local) Grand Bargain, the National Resource Network, NYU Wagner and the Urban Institute provide the following steps to establishing a productive and far-reaching connection between anchor institutions and cites that will lead to structured, systematic partnerships in pursuit of mutual self-interest and large-scale improvements. 

 

The New Grand Bargain Between Cities and Anchor Institutions

CITYLAB.COM; BY RICHARD FLORIDA; OCTOBER, 5, 2015

The driving force in our economy has shifted from those behemoths to clusters of companies, talent, and support industries. Those clusters do not just emerge out of thin air; more often than not they revolve around large anchor institutions—mainly research universities, colleges, medical centers, and other creative or knowledge-based institutions—that help shape and structure urban economies. A new report from the National Resources Network, in partnership with NYU’s Wagner School and the Urban Institute, takes up the challenge of creating more powerful synergies between cities and their anchor institutions.

 

Other Coverage

National Resource Network Recognized as a Bright Idea

Harvard Recognizes White House Strong Cities, Strong Communities Initiative as a "Bright Idea"

HR & A ADVISORS, INC. MARCH 20, 2015 

In February 2015, the Strong Cities, Strong Communities (SC2) initiative, which includes the National Resource Network (the Network), was selected as a finalist by Harvard University’s Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation for its annual Innovations in American Government Award. SC2 also received a “Bright Idea” designation and joined the Ash Center’s Government Innovator’s Network.

311 FOR CITIES

Editorial: Trenton's inclusion in national '311 for Cities' provides valuable resources for change

THE TIMES OF TRENTON; BY THE TIMES OF TRENTON’S EDITORIAL BOARD; JUNE 11, 2014

As he takes office July 1, Trenton’s new mayor will have an invaluable resource at the ready to help put Trenton back on track. The city was one of 50 chosen nationwide to take part in the National Resource Network or 311 for Cities, a pilot program launched last month by the Obama administration.

As The Times’ Jenna Pizzi reported this week, it’s a one-stop resource for local government officials to aid cities with strategies for economic recovery.

Sounding as if it were tailor-made for Trenton, the network offers direct access to experts, technical advice and information that can help city leaders address the “challenges of growing inequality, high unemployment, under-performing schools, aging infrastructure, and vacant and blighted properties,” according to its federal architects.

City of Harlingen to participate in National Resource Network’s “311 for Cities” serviceKVEO; May 26, 2014

NATIONAL RESOURCE NETWORK LAUNCHES

HUD Launches New Network Aimed at Helping Cities Learn From Each Other

NEXT CITY; BY ARIELLA COHEN; MAY 22, 2014

Aimed at helping urban professionals share resources and knowledge, and generally learn from one another, the network is just one part of the Obama administration’s efforts to break down silos in government and empower cities.

From Washington, a “311 for Cities”; GOVERNING.COM; BY NEIL KLEIMAN; JUNE 3, 2014

Obama administration selects Trenton to participate in national aid pilot program; The Times of Trenton; By Kelly Johnson; May 28, 2014

Trenton selected for Obama Administration pilotThe Trentorian; By David Foster; May 28, 2014

City in new network to promote economic progress; VALLEY MORNING STAR (HARLINGEN, TX); MAY 25, 2014

Experts to Help Cities with Holistic Economic Recovery (must subscribe to access article); The Bond Buyer; By Shelly Sigo; May 23, 2014

Obama Administration Announces “311” Resource for Cities Seeking Innovation and Economic RevitalizationRealEstateRama; May 23, 2014

 

To learn more about the National Resource Network, check out What We Do.